Anonymous
Earlier this year

NBA responds to NBL Next Stars program

NBA commissioner Adam Silver and G League president Shareef Abdur-Rahim have worked to eliminate two massive hurdles to convincing players uninterested in college basketball to pass on the lucrative National Basketball League of Australia by providing a massive salary increase and a structure that doesn't include playing full time in the G League.

California high school star Jalen Green, the No. 1 prospect in the 2020 ESPN 100, is making the leap to a reshaped NBA professional pathway program -- a G League initiative that sources say will pay elite prospects $500,000-plus and provide a one-year development program outside of the minor league's traditional team structure.

Green -- a potential No. 1 overall pick in the 2021 NBA draft -- announced Thursday that he is bypassing college to become the professional pathway's first participant, a decision that likely clears the way for more commitments from elite prospects.

His decision to join the NBA and G League's development program for the 2020-21 season has broad implications for the future of the NCAA and NBA landscapes. NBA commissioner Adam Silver and G League president Shareef Abdur-Rahim have worked to eliminate two massive hurdles to convincing players uninterested in college basketball to pass on the lucrative National Basketball League of Australia by providing a massive salary increase and a structure that doesn't include playing full time in the G League.


Once top 2020 draft prospects LaMelo Ball and RJ Hampton chose to play professionally in Australia this year, Silver became more determined in pushing Abdur-Rahim to explore a financial and basketball structure that enticed top American prospects. Green represents a massive breakthrough for the NBA's long-standing goal of gaining access to top prospects who want an alternative to the NCAA.

"That's a real program that the NBL has," Abdur-Rahim told ESPN. "It's appealing. We have kids leaving the United States -- Texas and California and Georgia -- to go around the world to play, and our NBA community has to travel there to scout them. That's counterintuitive. The NBA is the best development system in the world, and those players shouldn't have to go somewhere else to develop for a year. They should be in our development system."

Abdur-Rahim reported back to Silver on the factors that he believed needed altering for the program to become viable. First, the $125,000 salary lagged significantly behind mid-six-figure offers in Australia.

Full story: https://www.espn.com/nba/story/_/id/29043828/sources-top-high-school-player-jalen-green-enter-nba-g-league-pathway

This revamped program has secured the signature of projected #1 pick Jalen Green and in my opinion effectively spells the end of the NBL's next stars recruitment of US high school stars.

Topic #47155 | Report this topic


AngusH  
Earlier this year

Now *this* is something the NCAA should be concerned about.

Reply #803335 | Report this post


hawky  
Earlier this year

Whilst not ideal, I think the NBL can adapt. Look to sign the Aussie kids into the program and really target some second round draft picks from the previous years draft ala Didi. Some American kids/agents might also prefer the NBL given its stature as one of the best leagues world wide in a country that feels close to home.

It really hurts the college system, which is also a bonus for the NBL as the more normal it becomes to not go the college route, the chances we have of attracting these top prospects will only increase.

Reply #803336 | Report this post


ME  
Earlier this year

The NBA's selfishness strikes me a lot here. I mean, what should it matter if NBA draft prospects don't play in the USA? Why couldn't they let the NBL have this one? They're going to be playing for you in ONE FUCKING YEAR. You're a multi-billion dollar business. I don't see how the NBA can pretend to care about the longterm growth of basketball internationally while taking opportunities for foreign market to grow domestic interest in the sport.

Reply #803337 | Report this post


Anonymous  
Earlier this year

Also the G League isn't a real league.

Reply #803338 | Report this post


Anonymous  
Earlier this year

You're as thick as the log you were born on ME.

Reply #803339 | Report this post


LV  
Earlier this year

Isn't the G League meant to be full of me-first players, resulting in a jungle ball style? And isn't there constant turnover with NBA- meaning less roster stability and less chance for coaches to develop a solid structure?

Or are those just cheap stereotypes?

If there's validity to those criticisms then the NBL has more going for it than just a better salary. It will prepare players better for the NBA- which, if they've got a good head on their shoulders and a wise agent advising them - is something they should be most interested in anyway.

Why should money be the main consideration when most of these guys go on to make tens of millions of dollars?

Reply #803340 | Report this post


LV  
Earlier this year

I only read the OP before

Now that I've read the article itself...

[yearlong developmental program with G League oversight that will include professional coaching, top prospects and veteran players who will combine training and exhibition competitions against the likes of G League teams, foreign national teams and NBA academies throughout the world, sources said.

.....

The primary objective will be assimilation and growth into the NBA on several levels -- from playing to the teaching of life skills.]

This addresses my question

Definitely a major threat to Next Stars then.

Oh well, it was good while it lasted. If Larry Kestleman has forced a major reshaping of the way the NBA develops it's future stars, then that's a job well done. What say you, Larry critics?

Reply #803341 | Report this post


Billy Bob  
Earlier this year

The G League has changed a lot with nearly all teams having their own aligned teams. Very high quality play now.

Reply #803345 | Report this post


Cram  
Earlier this year

I say the next stars program has attracted only 2 Americans that have chosen the NBL over the college system and one of their did not play.

It's clear that guys like Hampton and Ball we're being paid well in excess of their ability to help the side win games too so it was highly unsustainable.

Reply #803349 | Report this post


koberulz  
Earlier this year

What does their ability to help the side win have to do with how sustainable it is?

Reply #803350 | Report this post


Cram  
Earlier this year

If they're spending too import money on a player who isn't ready to help the team win, fans will stay away. As Hawks fans did.

Reply #803351 | Report this post


koberulz  
Earlier this year

The team aren't spending it, the league is spending it. And fans have been avoiding Hawks games for years.

Reply #803352 | Report this post


Cram  
Earlier this year

Is the league footing the whole bill? Is that confirmed? There is a distinct lack of transparency on this. Some insist they're getting 100k as per the first version of the program media kit. Others say the league pays 100k and teams are free to pay more. You're saying the league pays the whole amount. Can you point to anywhere where this is confirmed as I genuinely haven't seen it.

Reply #803353 | Report this post


Anonymous  
Earlier this year

The better scheme would be to get NBA owners to buy an NBL team and stash talent with huge buy outs so that they wont be touched by other teams.

You want Lamello? sure its 50mill buy out.

The NBA reaction was always going to happen once they saw it worked positively. They got the NBL to do the testing and measuring for them and no cost. Smart business.

The real loser is the NCAA who has the kharma bus arriving at their door.

Reply #803354 | Report this post


koberulz  
Earlier this year

kharma

Reply #803362 | Report this post


Alpha  
Earlier this year

Don't think it will impact NCAA much, the scheme is meant for an elite not everyone, my guess up to 10 HS leavers may get something similar in a given year, even this would require lots of resources to achieve (it's not all in money). College will still remain one of the most important sources for non-draftees. So NCAA will still keep making a big buck. Next stars is a different story, there is no chance that anyone in this league can match that kind of money for a potential lottery pick, needs to be a crowd draw card like Melo.

Reply #803363 | Report this post


Anonymous  
Earlier this year

Nbl should be taking nba stash players not nbaprospectsimo.

Reply #803364 | Report this post


Anonymous  
Earlier this year

Come on Cram do you really think the Hawks had enough money to be spending $0.5m on LaMelo.

Reply #803367 | Report this post


Anonymous  
Earlier this year

"What does their ability to help the side win have to do with how sustainable it is?"

How sustainable it is is a function of how much revenue the program brings to the league. It sounded like it got a lot of eyeballs last year, which is a start to generating more advertising revenue.

Reply #803368 | Report this post


Anonymous  
Earlier this year

"Nbl should be taking nba stash players not nbaprospectsimo"

True, maybe the NBL can shift more focus onto the "Didi rule" to maintain overseas interest, as well as targeting the Aussie Next Stars, which they've already started doing.

Reply #803369 | Report this post


Anonymous  
Earlier this year

Hey Cram, if you haven't noticed the fans don't attend the Hawks games well and this is a trend established over many years now.

In a related story, the Hawks seem to go into voluntary administration every few years too.

Reply #803370 | Report this post


D2.0  
Earlier this year

Unfortunately there is a typical American selfishness & arrogance to the way Major Leagues are run.
And its sad. There are around 20 US States (that's whole states, not just major cities) that have no major-league sport. (no NBA, NFL, NBA, or NHL)

MLB has essentially gutted the rest of baseball in America. All the AA & AAA teams are now development "farms" for MLB affiliates.

What's disappointing about this, is that once again, the Americans have acted to protect "their turf", rather than seeing the mutuals advantages offered by the NBL.
It remains to be seen exactly how this program will unfold, but basically they are going to pay these kids $500k to sit around choking the chook for a year, just to stop the NBL pinching a bit of their limelight. It's going to cost them a LOT more than that to implement a program that would better the development they got playing in the NBL

Also, considering that Americans will rush to sue if the egg in their McMuffin is overcooked, I can see lawsuits developing. If a kid is a "top-rated" highschool prospect, and denied entry to this elite program, he'll sue the NBA. If a kid is accepted and fails to get drafted, he'll sue alleging they defrauded him of a college education.

Putting aside the virus, and its lingering economic impact, if we can continue to innovate and adapt, this could actually be a good thing for the NBL.
With this pathway now officially open, there's going to be a lot more kids wanting to make choice to go pro, and those who don't get into this programs will be ripe for the picking.
Ok, so we won't get the RJ Hamptons or Jalen Greens, but maybe that's a good thing? Taking somebody touted as a top-5 pick, and turning them into a top-5 pick, is hardly noteworthy. But if we can take a kid who missed the NBA programs, and get him drafted (or even playing) ahead of those selected, then that will be a huge endorsement for our league.

Reply #803371 | Report this post


Anonymous  
Earlier this year

I guess one advantage of the NBL over the G-League is that you can play in front of bigger crowds and bright lights. Whereas most of those G-League games look very "minor league" (which is fine, because that's what it is intended to be).

I guess the clever thing the NBA has done is make it not all about playing in the G-League, but more about player development.

Reply #803372 | Report this post


Cram  
Earlier this year

"Come on Cram do you really think the Hawks had enough money to be spending $0.5m on LaMelo."

When has lack of money stopped an NBL team spending lots of it anyway? Especially in the current LK model where unlimited spending is plan a, b, C and d.

Reply #803373 | Report this post


LoveBroker  
Earlier this year

Their rationale for this is weak, they don't want to have to travel to scout those players?

They are playing in Sydney not Afghanistan.

I however don't see this as the end of the Next Stars, what about the not so highly touted Hs'ers? The four star prospects who don't want college may still want to come over to the NBL?

Reply #803374 | Report this post


Cram  
Earlier this year

They'll sit on the bench like Armstrong.

Reply #803375 | Report this post


Big Ads  
Earlier this year

Yes, there appears a strong emphasis on development of elite players (both on and off the court) IN THE USA (and not in the NCAA) and reducing the tyranny of distance for NBA Scouts/Recruiters.

I don't know much about the G-League but I can envision the NBA growing this program into Development Hubs (perhaps based at a central location of each of the 6 Divisions) with games eventually being played between each hub instead of G-League teams and some exhibition games.

It also appears to provide another pathway for cut/retiring players to stay involved as active mentors.

I expect this will impact on NBL teams also attracting exciting young talent to stay in Australia.

Reply #803376 | Report this post


Big Ads  
Earlier this year

*exciting young local talent*

Reply #803377 | Report this post


koberulz  
Earlier this year

Also, considering that Americans will rush to sue if the egg in their McMuffin is overcooked, I can see lawsuits developing.
What astounds me is that Americans have managed to establish this reputation off the back of one case, which is only regarded as baseless because the settlement included a non-disclosure agreement and the woman was promptly slandered by all the press while McDonald's buried the actual truth of the matter. So not only was it not in fact a baseless suit, even if it was it's still one damn lawsuit in a country of millions, and yet it's held up as emblematic of Americans as a whole.

If a kid is accepted and fails to get drafted, he'll sue alleging they defrauded him of a college education.
And get laughed out of court. This is literally no different to if he hadn't bothered to sue at all, so I'm not sure why he would, or why the NBA would care.

Reply #803378 | Report this post


Anonymous  
Earlier this year

There is no age limit on somebody attending college which adds to the likelihood of someone getting laughed out of court based on missing out on college.

Reply #803380 | Report this post


Cram  
Earlier this year

Right now there's a fairly big gap in how good g league teams are in developing talent. The raptors use their team well and have developed Siakam, FVV and others through that program. In contrast, they sent Deandre Daniels to Australia...

G League is always going to be preferred by the NBA and it's clubs as it makes it easier to get to their games or even watch them on tv at a suitable time. If that program becomes successful enough it'll get far more eyeballs than the NBL ever could purely based in timezone.

Reply #803381 | Report this post


Anonymous  
Earlier this year

The NBA is responsible to serve itself and it's owners, these guys (women not sure there are any in those positions atm, that would be a criticism) did not get uber rich by having a heart and looking after someone else's business or spending a few extra thousand when they could avoid it.

The NBA wants earlier access to their players, get them into the NBA life, the sooner they can fast track their development the sooner they profit from them.

When compared to college if a player has a career ending/threatening injury in this suggested arrangement you would think at worst they banked the up to 500k and they would have career ending insurance which could net them another 100-150K, that alone should kill college programmes.

What does it mean for the NBL, we might not see the same high profile next stars, but let's say Lamelo or Rj make a successful transition to the NBL, if a prospect thinks that they will get more attention, exposure etc or be better prepared by playing here, they will still come.



Reply #803383 | Report this post


KET  
Earlier this year

and yet it's held up as emblematic of Americans as a whole.


America is an incredibly litigious and jurisdictional country in comparison to other common law nations, particularly in respect of SLAPP suits and even generally bizarre concepts derived out of thin air such as pre-possession in the event you are in the line of a baseball being hit and someone reaches over to catch it.

Other favourite American cases involve someone suing Pepsi Co because they expected the company to give them a Harrier Jump Jet.

Reply #803384 | Report this post


Anonymous  
Earlier this year

The $0.5 million (Ball salary reference above) would be in USA dollars, based on the 'mid six figures' reference in the OP's quote from the article. So more like $650,000-$750,000 in Australian dollars, depending on timing within last season.

I suspect the NBL got enough additional sponsorship, exposure and ticket revenue to warrant that investment.

This makes some of the salary figures bandied about on this forum, for more capable imports and Australian players (Cotton, Ware, Long, Kay etc.), seem plausible.

Reply #803389 | Report this post


Anonymous  
Earlier this year

Next Stars in its current guise as a pathway for elite players straight out of high school (from the US) appears dead with this announcement.

If it's to survive, i think (and like others have said) that it needs to re-focus on the draft-stash route.

Another possible amendment could be to include un-drafted players that are first year out of college. Some of the kids that go un-drafted due to athletic limitations or other reasons would be perfect. Plenty of gems coming out of the NCAA every year

Reply #803397 | Report this post


Luuuc  
Earlier this year

You suck, NBA. Couldn't even let us have one year :(
Boooo!!!

Reply #803408 | Report this post


Anonymous  
Earlier this year

Along wth nba stash players, we shoulddd be Going afte big name Asian players.
Baba, Watanabe, remy Martin plus a few of years the up and coming koreans and Chinese. Aloft growth in middle east also.

Reply #803411 | Report this post


Anonymous  
Earlier this year

Isaiah Todd, who Jeremy loeliger has previously mentioned the nbl has been in discussions with, has announced he will join the G league program too.

Reply #803417 | Report this post


Anonymous  
Earlier this year

We don't need Next Stars. It’s good for local talent and good marketing if your last name is Ball but other than that I don’t think some college players on small minutes are going to be a game changer for the league.

Reply #803437 | Report this post


D2.0  
Earlier this year

The difference in the USA is that judgements are determined by juries, and they award damages based on pain & suffering (including emotional distress, etc, etc, etc) AND they award punitive damages.

In Australia, you have to prove that you suffered actual economic loss, and that's all you can claim. That also limits the lawyers taking cases on contingencies. It does happen here, but its comparatively rare, and the case has to be a slam-dunk before a lawyer will touch it.
In America, they will roll the dice on just about anything.

It's why so many decisions in the USA are driven by fear of litigation.
Now obviously they will have considered this, and consulted many, many lawyers, I'm just interested to see what form the final program takes.

Reply #803444 | Report this post


rjd  
Earlier this year

Also defendants in the US must generally pay for their own legal expenses even if they win, unlike Australia, which creates opportunities for SLAPP lawsuits and lawsuits designed only to extract a settlement out of court to avoid legal expenses. Then there is the freedom for lawyers to advertise. There is a good reason why the US has a reputation for litigiousness.

Reply #803519 | Report this post


ZShaw  
Earlier this year

I think it's great for Aussies, this gives Australian natives more opportunities.

Instead of NBL teams looking for Americans, they can focus on grooming hometown talent.

Also if an Australian prospect wants to go to the NBA, then they have a better opportunity by going to the G League for a year to groom instead of wasting a year at college. Ie: Ben Simmons

Reply #805889 | Report this post


Anonymous  
Earlier this year

Any word on Tamuri Wigness and his plans?

Reply #805892 | Report this post




 

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